Bruderhof
   The Bruderhof is a Christian communal group inspired largely by the Hutterites, a communal Anabaptist group. It began in 1920, when Eberhard Arnold (1883-1935) and his wife, Emmy, opened a Christian commune in a rented German farmhouse. Reading Anabaptist history led to a fascination with the Hutterites, and in 1930 Arnold spent a year visiting the colonies in Canada.
   To escape the Nazis, in 1933 Bruderhof members moved first to Liechtenstein and then to England, where Arnold died in 1935, to Paraguay at the start of World War II, and finally to the United States, where they settled initially at Rifton, New York, still the informal headquarters. Further growth, largely from members of other communal groups, led to the founding of eight additional hofs in the U.S., England, and Australia. Internal discord has led to desertions at several important points, most recently in the 1980s, when charges of child abuse were leveled at some of the leaders. Ties with the Hutterite movement were broken in the 1990s. In 2000, the Bruderhof reported some 3,000 members.
   Further reading:
   ■ Eberhard Arnold, Why We Live in Community (Farmington, Pa.: Plough, 1995)
   ■ Emmy Arnold, Torches Together: The Beginning and Early Years of the Bruderhof Communities (Rifton, N.Y.: Plough, 1964)
   ■ Benjamin Zablocki, The Joyful Community (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1971).

Encyclopedia of Protestantism. . 2005.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Bruderhof — bezeichnet Bruderhof (Markt Rettenbach), ein Ortsteil der Marktgemeinde Markt Rettenbach, Landkreis Unterallgäu, Bayern Bruderhof (Scherstetten), ein Ortsteil der Gemeinde Scherstetten, Landkreis Augsburg, Bayern Bruderhof (Singen), eine… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Bruderhof Communities — The Bruderhof Communities (German: place of brothers) are Christian religious communities with branches in New York, Florida and Pennsylvania in the US, the United Kingdom, Germany, and Australia. They have previously been called The Society of… …   Wikipedia

  • Bruderhof (Hutterer) — Hutterischer Bruderhof in Mähren Bruderhof in …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Burgstall Bruderhof (Scherstetten) — p1 Burgstall Bruderhof (Scherstetten) Entstehungszeit: 13. Jahrhundert Burgentyp: Turmhügelburg Erhaltungszustand: Burgstall …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Hutterer — Die Hutterer sind eine täuferische Kirche, die auf Jakob Hutter zurückgeht und deren Anhänger in Gütergemeinschaft leben. Ihre Lehre und Glaubenspraxis waren der Grund, weshalb ihre Mitglieder seit der Gründung im Jahr 1528 häufig emigrieren… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Eberhard Arnold — (July 26, 1883 ndash; November 22, 1935) was a Christian German writer, philosopher, and theologian. He was the founder of the Bruderhof ( place of brothers ) in 1920.Arnold was born in Königsberg, East Prussia, Germany, the third child of Carl… …   Wikipedia

  • Hutterianer — Die Hutterer sind eine täuferische Kirche, die auf Jakob Hutter zurückgeht und deren Anhänger in Gütergemeinschaft leben. Ihre Lehre und Glaubenspraxis waren der Grund, weshalb ihre Mitglieder seit der Gründung im Jahr 1528 häufig emigrieren… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Hutterische Brüder — Die Hutterer sind eine täuferische Kirche, die auf Jakob Hutter zurückgeht und deren Anhänger in Gütergemeinschaft leben. Ihre Lehre und Glaubenspraxis waren der Grund, weshalb ihre Mitglieder seit der Gründung im Jahr 1528 häufig emigrieren… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Linzergasse — in Salzburg Die Linzergasse ist neben der Getreidegasse und der Steingasse die wohl bekannteste Gasse Salzburgs. Sie liegt in der Neustadt und verläuft heute von der Staatsbrücke bzw. dem kleinen Platzl bis zur Franz Josef Straße. In… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Hutterite — Hutterites are a communal branch of Anabaptists who, like the Amish and Mennonites, trace their roots to the Radical Reformation of the 16th century. Since the death of their founder Jakob Hutter in 1536, the beliefs of the Hutterites, especially …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”