Guinea
   The French conquered the land now called Guinea in the late 19th century. Since then, islam, Christianity, and traditional African religions have vied for the hearts of the people. As the 20th century came to an end, Islam had approximately 5 million adherents, compared with 2 million followers of traditional religions. Christians, most of whom are Roman Catholics, number less than 300,000 adherents.
   In 1918, the Christian and Missionary Alliance (CMA) was the first Protestant group to begin work, which included the building of two schools at Telekoro and Mamou. Arriving later in the century were the Anglicans, the Paris Evangelical Missionary Society (of the Reformed Church of France), and the Church of the Open Door, a Pentecostal church. In 1967, all foreign missionaries were ordered to leave the country. The CMA negotiated a deal whereby some of their missionaries could remain as staff for the two schools. All the churches quickly appointed indigenous leadership to carry on their work, but the CMA was able to concentrate on leadership training and continue their work in Bible translation. The Evangelical Protestant Church, which grew from the CMA missions, is by far the largest Protestant church in Guinea.
   The New Apostolic Church entered from Germany around 1970. In three decades it built a work of some 20,000 members. During the 1990s, Pentecostalism, brought to the country by French members of the Assemblies of God, had also begun to attract a sizable following. The visit to the country in 1992 of Evangelist Richard Bonnke had a marked effect; he became the catalyst for the organization of the Association des Eglises et Missions Evangélique en Guinea. Most of the Protestant/Free Church bodies operating in Guinea are members of this association, which is affiliated with the World Evangelical Alliance.No Guinea-based church is affiliated with the World Council of Churches.
   See also French West Africa.
   Further reading:
   ■ David Barrett, The Encyclopedia of World Christianity, 2nd ed. (New York: Oxford University Press, 2001)
   ■ Patrick Johnstone and Jason Mandryk, Operation World, 21st Century Edition (Carlisle, Cumbria, U.K.: Paternoster, 2001).

Encyclopedia of Protestantism. . 2005.

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  • Guinea — Guinea …   Deutsch Wörterbuch

  • Guinea — Guin ea (g[i^]n [ e]), n. 1. A district on the west coast of Africa (formerly noted for its export of gold and slaves) after which the Guinea fowl, Guinea grass, Guinea peach, etc., are named. [1913 Webster] 2. A gold coin of England current for… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • guinea — former British coin, 1660s, from Guinea, region along the west coast of Africa, presumably from an African word (perhaps Tuareg aginaw black people ); the 20 shilling coins so called because they were first minted for British trade with Guinea… …   Etymology dictionary

  • Guinea —  , Guinea Bissau, Equatorial Guinea  They are separate countries, all in West Africa. Guinea was formerly French Guinea. GuineaBissau was formerly Portuguese Guinea. Equatorial Guinea was formerly Spanish Guinea …   Bryson’s dictionary for writers and editors

  • Guinea —    Guinea, or Guinea Coast, is a geographical term of Berber origins used by Europeans from the fourteenth to the nineteenth centuries to designate varying sections of the western coast of Africa, a region that formed one apex of the Atlantic… …   Encyclopedia of the Age of Imperialism, 1800–1914

  • Guinea — Ober Guinea und West Sudan …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • GUINEA — vulgo la Guinee, regio Aficae perampla, inter Nigrititam ad Bor. et mare Atlanticum ad Austr. et inter regnum Congi ad Ort. et montem Leonis ad Occas. Regio est abundans et fertilis, ab Ort. in Occas. valde extensa, et ab Europaeis admodum… …   Hofmann J. Lexicon universale

  • guinea — [gin′ē] n. [the gold of which it was first made came from Guinea] 1. a former English gold coin, last minted in 1813, equal to 21 shillings: the word is still used in England in giving prices of luxury items 2. GUINEA FOWL 3. Slang an Italian or… …   English World dictionary

  • Guinēa — Guinēa, ein großer Theil der Westseite Afrikas, zu beiden Seiten des Äquator. Gewöhnlich versteht man aber unter G. den Küstenstrich zwischen dem Äquator u. 10° nördl. Br., welcher zum Unterschiede von dem südlich vom Äquator liegenden… …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • Guinēa — (spr. gi ; hierzu die Karte »Ober Guinea und West Sudân«), Teil der Westküste Afrikas, vom Kap Roxo (12°19´ nördl. Br.) bis Kap Negro (16° südl. Br.), zerfällt in zwei Teile: Oberguinea und Niederguinea, deren Grenze von Kap Lopez im… …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Guinea — a country in West Africa between Senegal and Sierra Leone. Population: 7,614,000 (2001). Capital: Conakry. Guinea used to belong to France. >Guinean n adj …   Dictionary of contemporary English

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